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fowler tells us about preparations some people are making. john is in richman where a fireworks show is set to begin -- richmond where a fireworks show is set to begin. >> reporter: beautiful here. this is the city getting a jump on the rest of the bay area. thiset up -- they set up food courts and children's activities and a fireworks display at dusk. here the weather is cooperating. many cities have parades and events tomorrow and there the threat is heat. >> reporter: decorating for tomorrow's parade. >> we love helping out the whole town and our motivation is the community. >> reporter: the 30th year, the town closes the freeway and streets. >> always a lot of fun. pick up vans. children. everybody dresses up. it is fun. >> reporter: it will be hot. a couple thousand people expected to turn out. >> 1500 bottles of water they are going to hand out and once we get down here we have cooling stations. >> reporter: across town the family preparing water bottles, t-shirts and hats for the 9th annual fundraiser run named for their daughter who died. >> we put together this run for a rea
by a rattlesnake. john fowler talked to an eyewitness with and is live nearby. john. >> reporter: family friends tell me the little boy is in the i.c.u. he was bitten in the leg at a little league basketball gap last night about 7:00 p.m. the shake was in the grass. near black hawk field. the-year-old boy apparently stepped on the rattler. >> before the paramedics took him it was swelling and bruising. didn't look very good. >> had swelling, pain at the site. sometimes it can develop into respiratory issues. >> he receive education bill antivenom and is reported okay. rattlesnakes like this diamondback we found at the museum. >> her rattlers are big. >> they are not aggressi but more mobile in hot weathere and more likely to run into us. >> cruising around looking for food. with kids, especially, they are looking around and don't see what is around them. >> reporter: jennifer cones was with her son at the ballgame she called 911. she said the boy ran back crying to the crew she was with. they kept him calm into paramedic arrived. family friends say the youngster is expected to be released from t
was bitten bay bath. health officials determined that the bath was infected with rabies. john fowler is live in the newsroom with new information on exactly what happened, john. >> reporter: i learned the teenage girl from berkeley was working as a zoo volunteer on saturday. the oakland zoo is flanked by highway 9. it is thought that it was a common mexican free tail bat. the teenager saw it at a zoo display. >> she went up to it and actually it got on her hand and she thinks that it bit her. >> she started the treatment, initial injection at the wound site. then three follow up injections over a period of time. she'll be okay. >> daniel wilson of alameda county says there's nothing especially risky about the zoo. this is the third rabid bat found in the east bay. one in pleasanton and the other in san lorenzo. never approach or touch a bat or any other wild animal that appears to be acting strangely. rabies is fatal if not treated properly. reporting live, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a south bay church leader is facing charges after they found more girls that were victimized at th
are battling the flames. ktvu's john fowler was one of the first reporters at the scene. he is live to tell us about the progress made by fire crews. >> the road remains shut down. this is an active fire scene. you can see smoke from the other side of the ridge. now we have just got an update. 300 acres burned and homes are still threatened. >> reporter: flames roared through dry brush, grass and trees. blackening hillsides. cal fire helicopters and air tankers attacked from above. firefighters protected homes in the flame's path. >> the flames were covering the hillside. i have never been so scared. >> reporter: dense smoke forcing animals to flee. firefighters struggled in 95- degree heat. gusting winds and brutal hills. >> canyons are steep on both sides. presents a problem for the firefighters trying to access it on the ground and for the aircraft that are fighting from the air. >> reporter: back live you can see the smoke still coming up over the ridge. the area of pittsburg on the other side is where the fire is burning now. firefighters say three small buildings were destroyed but nun o
the fire. ktvu's john fowler joins us live. are firefighters waking progress right now? >> reporter: apparently so. in the last 5 minutes the smoke from the other side of the ridge diminished significantly. you will see the fire crews close to the road. this is kirker pass. 328 acres burned. this fire threatened 2 dozen homes. >> reporter: flames through dry brush and grass about 1:00 p.m., blackening hillsides near kirker pass. cal fire helicopters and air tankers attacked this fire from above -- this fire from above as they protect homes. >> the flames were covering the hillside. >> there are canyons that are steep on both sides. prevent as problem for the firefighters and the aircraft. >> reporter: crews ring the hilltops and the smoke forced animals to flee. firefighters battled 95-100- degree heat here. gusting 15 miles per hour winds. 25 homes were threatened. all the homes were saved. the cause is still unknown. but firefighters say this was a very close call and a reminder of the extreme fire danger the next few days. firefighters will be out here all night. there is a great
being reparented to remove led -- repainted to remove led. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> the manufacturers are not denying older homes may have led paint. they are denying it is a major problem. >> reporter: the lawsuit demands companies pay a billion dollars to remove led paint from homes and repaint. >> i don't know. have to paint all the houses. i have no idea. >> reporter: 10 cities and counties today got their day in court in san jose. in a 13-year-old lawsuit. >> they have fought it all the way. we have been to the court of appeals twice. supreme court twice. >> governments say in oakland there are 400,000 homes like this one painted before 1978. companies say remediation has risks. >> really could increase the risk of exposure for children by creating led dust through abatement. >> reporter: experts call that hogwash. the risk is pealing paint. >> causing brain damage. and the other part is it takes so little to poise an child. >> reporter: 23,000 california children have elevated led levels. both sides presented opening arguments. there is a long lis
fowler -- john fowler joins us live with more. good afternoon, john? >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. within the last three minutes, firefighters confirm the leak has been at least temporarily capped. it's there at that corner of meridian and burnett. businesses here for four blocks are shut down. this is what it sounded like here at concord's auto center. >> you are in the commercial area with several customers inside doing business. we estimate between 50, 75 people had to be evacuated. >> reporter: firefighters say cona construction backhoe -- a construction back dehoe hit a line and firefighters and police evacuated the kia and toyota dealerships and other businesses. the fire department says somehow this happened despite having notified pg&e. let's take a listen. we've seen people trying to cross through here. the firefighters say the risk of fire and explosions is significant here. they are also trying to monitor for gas. it's heavier than aerosol. they are looking for them. pg&e was notified about the construction and somehow this accident still happened. we just got an update
in home construction. a story you will only see here. john fowler, he is live on the stanford campus to show you the home of the future. >> reporter: that's right. right here in the middle of campus a new home is going up it's so new designers want to you think of it like a car crews installed high tech soo lar panels on the stanford concept house. a new take being energy efficient. >> these two sides of the roof. >> reporter: a few miles away retired contractor, told me he would like solar for his home. >> it's so expensive to do. it's so expensive to manufacturer. >> reporter: at $27,000 it would take him ten years to break even the idea is fundamentally different. designed like a car. >> we are seeing car that are getting more efficient year by year. homes pretty much staying the same. >> reporter: students are building this house for an international competition with solaa power, insulation, it nets no power from the grid. it took them six days to complete the basic one bedroom shell. base around a sort engine. >> then made it really easy for people to build any kind of house
of an obscure state law. since 1975 it has set fixed cap on certain medical malpractice awards. john fowler is investigating if that law needs to be changed. >> reporter: doctors and clinics say keeping that malpractice cap reduces their costs, allows them to treat more patients better. some activists and families say it's unfair. >> i can't believe she's not here. >> reporter: jessica can of san francisco teared up over photos of her mom. >> it makes me want to fight harder. >> reporter: 59-year-old michelle wu died from what a jury found to be medical malpractice. jessica said several attorneys declined to take her case. >> it's unjust for everybody who goes through any sort of medical malpractice case. >> last -- >> reporter: steven pratt says upping that cap could cost billions. >> take it out of the healthcare system and put it into the pockets of the trial lawyers. couldn't come at a worse possible time. >> reporter: patient advocates want voters to decide whether to overhaul the law. raise that cap on noneconomic damages such as pain and suffering from $250,000 to over $1 million. >>
there covering the fires. john fowler and john mackenzie found themselves surrounded by flames. >> reporter: suddenly a blast of wind roars up the canyon to veteran firefighters a warning of impending peril. >> there's wind, let's go. >> let's get out of here. we're out of here. jeff we're out of here. >> jeff. >> hey, i have to go. >> reporter: they have to turn their trucks on this dirt trail for the fire is jumping the lines up ahead. >> let's go. there's the fire right there. >> yeah, i know. >> camera man john mackenzie, a park ranger our guide and i are in the line. it's impossible to describe the heat, the smell, the sound of a wildfire. our only out is through the fire. fortunately some what subsided, a casualty truck abandoned. jason cooley tribed what happened. >> the wildfire built up momentum and sparked up over the line before the fire got there. that's one of the risks when you build a backfire, set a backfire. and on the other hand, backfiring into those kind of conditions is about the only way to contain the fire. >>> in 1998, it was ktvu reporter lloyd lacuesta who was cov
crash. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is live with what is no longer allowed. john? >> reporter: the f asiana airlines says still -- the faa says till it is operational again foreign airliners are prohibited to make visual approaches. >> reporter: all foreign airliners must use a instrument approach to sfo. we learned this comes after several incidents. the latest sixty six nights ago -- six nights ago. controllers ordered pilots to abort and try again. and nowphone pilots can no longer make visual -- and now foreign pilots can no longer make visual landings. forcing a more precise approach requires closer attention to attitude. when pilots approach sfo they are over featureless water leading to anopical a-- an optical allusion. >> we think we are higher than we are so we could be taken by surprise. >> reporter: domestic airlines are not subject to the new rule. it is not clear if abe -- if asiana airlines flight 214 would have benefited from this rule. >> it is an added layer of safety. >> reporter: these new procedures will be in effect till the approach equipment
the son of a los angeles fire captain. >> another had moved to fight fires. >>> our john fowler tells us how cities are preparing for heat and crowds. >> there are children's activities, food vendors and live music will take place. >> the big worry tomorrow is heat. >> the cheer squad this afternoon, decorating for tomorrow's parade. >> we love helping out the whole town and our whole motivation are the arenda community. >> it's the 30th year as the town closes an off ramp and streets. >> a lot of children, everybody dresses up. it's fun. >> it will also be scorching hot. >> we'll have misters and a cooling station. >> across town, the tom family preparing water bottles and t-shirts and hats for the fundraiser run named for their daughter who died of unexplained death in childhood. >> we put together this run for a reason in honor of her, and all the proceeds go towards medical research. >> everyone tomorrow urged to follow this cheerleader's advise. >> we'll drink a lot of water and trying to stay in the shade, and use a lot of sun screen. >> tonight's show planned around this marine. o
live, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> firefighters are watching for hot spots right now after a vegetation fire broke out last night. one of the hot spots flared up just before noon. we were there when fire crews jumped on the flames and prevented them from spreading. want original fire broke out about 9:30 last night. >> winds have the -- had the brush been of a greater size it would have pushed embers down into mill valley. >> fire crews plan to stay on the mountain tonight. marin county fire says the cause of the fire is under investigation, but fireworks have been ruled out. >>> a lot of people are asking questions about a story we told you about concerning the marin county fair. earlier this week we reported to you about the county's new clothing guidelines to make sure there is no gang messaging going on. we mentioned pro baseball hats and jerseys including a's gear. we want to clarify a lot of people are wearing a's gear at the fair, as you can see if n this video. it is allowed. if appropriate or concerning behavior is observed, the fair does have the right to ask you
editor, john fowler sat down with one pilot expert who designed instruments for the boeing 777. >> visual queues should have been obvious to the pilots. >> there are a lot of accidents where there have been very salient clues to crews that have been miss. >> julian fox design cockpit instruments. >> she says scientists call uninitial blindless to the cockpit. >> they would have had a lot of information telling them that. >> sink rate and altitude, if too slow, they were glowing beside the raun way. >> runway. >> the throttle should come forward when slow and may have at least partially. >> at 500 feet they should have been computing a go-around. >> again, we'll be asking why didn't that happen. >> where was the retention and why was it on anything other than flying the airplane? >> the ntsb now has to figure out exactly why those basic skills, what pilots called airmanship broke down during this flight crew. >> ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and go to ktvu.com for more crash coverage. >> you'll find a link to the crash site along with unedited video of today's ntsb news conference. >>> mark tam
for sfo first responders. here is ktvu's john fowler the day united flight 232 with 285 passengers on board crashed in su city iowa. >> reporter: in the seconds prior to this horrifying crash. it was clear the pilot was fighting enormous control pressures and the laws of engine power. an international guard pilot was in the air near by watching. >> he was having severe controlability problems and was unsure he could make landing. shortly, the right wing began to dip or began to roll. and the nose began to fall. it was very apparent at that moment that he could not make a safe landing. >> reporter: there are three separate hydraulic systems, apparently all three failed. each carries fuel like in a car. too set the flaps and to operate the landing gear and brakes. without hydrodrawlics, flawing this airplane is like wrestling a gorilla. >> we landed and it was really hard. we skidded for a while on our side. and then flipped over. and skidded some more and finally stopped and i was hanging upside down. i released my seat belt, basically fell to the ceiling which was down now. and loo
. this is one of the many reasons they call california the most flamable place on the planet. john fowler is live to tell us how home owners can protect themselves. >> reporter: firefighters tell me that this canyon is one of the most flamable places in the east bay. experts tell me that the entire state is as increased fire risks. with houses tight amongst the brush and trees -- >> we've done lots to take steps to prevent our house from being a target. >> reporter: 22 years ago, the most costly fire in history. many displaced move today lafayette. fire goes from grass to brush to trees. >> you get more energy from the fire until you have the energy to ignite something big like a house. >> reporter: this 27,000-acre california blaze was one of 4177 fires this year that. cease 50% higher than average. fire danger is trending worse. >> we're living in probably the most flamable real life 101 estate in the world. >> reporter: keith gill list head tropical storm state board of forest try and fire protection. he said more and more people are live ng harms way and add to that, dwindling resourc
there watching for flare ups. john fowler was there near the frontlines today, as flames destroyed three buildings. >> reporter: flames roared through dry brush, grass, and trees. rapidly blackening hillsides. cal fire helicopter and air tankers from above. >> the flames were covering that hillside. >> reporter: dense smoke, forcing animals to flee. firefighters struggled here in 95-degree heat. gusting bone dry winds, and brutal hills. >> there are some canyons that are very steep on both sides, which presents a problem not only for the firefighters trying to access it on the ground, but the aircraft trying to fight the fire from the air. >> reporter: three smallout buildings were destroyed. a total of 25 homes were threatened, but none damaged. firefighters are credited for swift response and say they'll monitor hot spots overnight. firefighters say investigators still do not know the cause of this blaze. they say power lines were down, but that may have been the result of the fire, not the cause. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu, channel 2 news. >>> a fire in el dorado cou
. they say they will spend the night there watching for flare ups. john fowler was there near the frontlines today, as flames destroyed three buildings. >> reporter: flames roared through dry brush, grass, and trees. rapidly blackening hillsides. cal fire helicopter and air tankers from above. >> the flames were covering that hillside. >> reporter: dense smoke, forcing animals to flee. firefighters struggled here in 95-degree heat. gusting bone dry winds, and brutal hills. >> there are some canyons that are very steep on both sides, which presents a problem not only for the firefighters trying to access it on the ground, but the aircraft trying to fight the fire from the air. >> reporter: three smallout buildings were destroyed. a total of 25 homes were threatened, but none damaged. firefighters are credited for swift response and say they'll monitor hot spots overnight. firefighters say investigators still do not know the cause of this blaze. they say power lines were down, but that may have been the result of the fire, not the cause. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu, channel 2
the heat. inland temperatures topped 100 degrees again today. ktvu's john fowler is live in antioch. how hot is it there now? >> reporter: i tell you, we just put this on. it is 103 degrees right here. a little toasty. i tell you it is not detouring the people who came out here for the car show, fireworks and parade here in antioch. it is all made possible by donations, $60,000 when the city ran out of money. >> we came together as a committee and decided that this had to go on for the people. >> nothing better than seeing the old cars. definitely. >> reporter: in danville and other small towns, a tradition seemed to be thriving. >> happy 4th. [ music ] >> reporter: we found patriotism rekindled today. >> we stopped doing our activities and we come together and celebrate our country together as a community. i think that is -- hits my heart. i always cry every year. >> reporter: no talk of taxes, healthcare and government. we found people reflecting on what is good in america. >> freedom to make choices. be who you are. >> reporter: some got a chance tostrut their stuff. he just started t
proved its worth. reporting live health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a number of victims from the plane crash have been released from the hospital in the last 24 hours. of the 62 patients, 12 remain in the hospital. nine are adults and three are children. five are in critical condition including one child. the other patients conditions range from good to serious. 55 of the crash victims were initially admitted to stanford hospital and tonight five remain in the hospital and one remains in critical condition. all of the victims that were treated at lucielle packered have been released. >> i was able to talk to some of the young kids thatted had some injuries that need attention but they were in a talkative mood. they were happy to see the mayor there. >> the player said he did not want to disturb people with more serious injuries. he also gave thanks to doctors and nurses who came to work in droves to help after that crash. >>> nancy pelosi thanked the fearless response of rescue crews. pelosi also expressed grief for those two teenage victims. >>
editor john fowler talked with the trauma team today and some of the survivors who describe the moment of impact. >> reporter: we were allowed at san francisco medical where the mood was intense. the crash was tragic but after seeing this video on channel 2 today he called it a miracle. >> i thought there were going to be a lot more victims who were going to die from the crash. it's amazing that so many people walked away from this, this accident. >> reporter: on saturday, dr. campbell and others treated 62 victims that came to san francisco in four waves. on scene triage got the most serious to surgery within 45 minutes of the crash. >> the full gammot of blunt force injury that was really catastrophic. >> reporter: inside the cabin, first class had shoulder belts, economy lab belts only suffering more abdomen injuries. passengers bodied thrashed with bone breaking force. >> the organs inside will get disrupted. >> i couldn't breathe for like because i got the wind knocked out of me. so i couldn't breathe for a couple of seconds. >> it was like, we were all bouncing all over the place
victims are being treated. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler talked with the trauma team today and some of the survivors who describe the moment of impact. >> reporter: we were allowed at san francisco medical where the mood was intense. the crash was tragic but after seeing this video on channel 2 today he called it a miracle. >> i thought there were going to be a lot more victims who were going to die from the crash. it's amazing that so many people walked away from this, this accident. >> reporter: on saturday, dr. campbell and others treated 62 victims that came to san francisco in four waves. on scene triage got the most serious to surgery within 45 minutes of the crash. >> the full gammot of blunt force injury that was really catastrophic. >> reporter: inside the cabin, first class had shoulder belts, economy lab belts only suffering more abdomen injuries. passengers bodied thrashed with bone breaking force. >> the organs inside will get disrupted. >> i couldn't breathe for like because i got the wind knocked out of me. so i couldn't breathe for a couple of seconds. >> it
for hundredsf thousands. -- of hundreds of thousands. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is live with more. >> reporter: almost every house build before 1978 could have a layer or layers of toxic led paint. the question today is this paint a public nuisance. >> the lawsuit demands paint companies spend a billion dollars to remove led paint from homes homes and repaint them. >> sounds good to me. >> reporter: after 13 years of paint company challenges a judge today began trial. >> this is the first day that justice will be done. >> he represents 10 cities and counties. claiming paint companies knew for decades led paint could peal off and be hazardous. >> they are liability for the tuxicity presented by led in paint. >> reporter: 23,000 children are sickened by paint but paint companies said a program has worked. and there is no problem now. >> california's levels stand on historic lows. lower than the national average. very successful programs. >> reporter: he says just in the city of oakland 400,000 homes are effected. especially in low income neighborhoods. >>aubrain mage perm
officials review this litigation. reporting live in sebastopol, health and science editor john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a new announcement, the new nexus seven goes on sell next tuesday. it is thinner than before and has twice the processor speed. it sells for $229, 30% less than the apple ipad mini. another rival product, amazon's kindle fire, cost $199. only on 2, an exclusive field poll finds that california voters have their highest regard ever for former secretary of state hillary clinton. 30% responded unfavorable. 13% had no opinion. californians have a lower opinion of the two republicans considered likely presidential candidates. 21% gave kentucky senator rant paul a favorable rating. 22% rated marco rubio favorably. >>> californians could see a barrage of advertising to try to convince people to enroll in health coverage under president obama's affordable care act. more than $300 million may be spent on television and online ads, billboards and door-to- door marketing in california. in addition, the california endowment expects to spend another $130 million reaching out to
. >>> health and science editor john fowler explains how this energy efficient house is actually modeled after a car. it's a story you will see only on 2. >> reporter: crews install high tech solar panels today on stanford university's concept house. a radical new take on energy efficiency. >> we use these three sides of the roof. >> reporter: retired contractor aaron lucien says he really likes solar efficientty for his home. >> because it's so expensive to do. it's expensive to manufacturer. great concept. >> reporter: but at 7,000 a piece, it could take him 10 years to break even. but this house is fundamentally different. designed like a car. >> we're seeing cars that are getting more energy efficient year by year. the homes are pretty much staying the same energy hogs they used to be. >> reporter: the students are building this home for a competition. it nets zero power from the grid. it took them just six days to complete the basic one bedroom shell based upon a modular core with high tech heating, cooling and appliances. >> reporter: made it real easy for homeowners and builders and de
if he died from west nile or an underlying illness. >>> health and science editor john fowler explains how this energy efficient house is actually modeled after a car. it's a story you will see only on 2. >> reporter: crews install high tech solar panels today on stanford university's concept house. a radical new take on energy efficiency. >> we use these three sides of the roof. >> reporter: retired contractor aaron lucien says he really likes solar efficientty for his home. >> because it's so expensive to do. it's expensive to manufacturer. great concept. >> reporter: but at 7,000 a piece, it could take him 10 years to break even. but this house is fundamentally different. designed like a car. >> we're seeing cars that are getting more energy efficient year by year. the homes are pretty much staying the same energy hogs they used to be. >> reporter: the students are building this home for a competition. it nets zero power from the grid. it took them just six days to complete the basic one bedroom shell based upon a modular core with high tech heating, cooling and appliances. >> rep
for pain and suffering. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler examines both sides of the debate. >> reporter: jessica teared up today over photos of her mom. >> it makes me want to fight harder, you know. >> reporter: michelle woo died from what a jury found to be medical dysfunction. >> i'm an only child. >> reporter: several attorneys denied to take her case because medical malpractice settlements are capped. upping that cap could cost billions. >> take it out of the health care system and put it into the pockets of the trial lawyers. this couldn't come at a worse possible time. >> reporter: advocates want lawyers to decide whether to overhaul the 38 year law. raise that cap on noneconomic damages such as pain and suffering from 200,000 to over $1 million. >> it's very important that the laws change. >> reporter: a jury said medical errors called robin franco's brain damage and she should get $1 million. >> she was only awarded $250,000 out of that 6 million. >> reporter: opponents include doctors, clinics, nurses, unions and local governments. >> a lot of people have a lot to
micra that caps damaged for pain and suffering. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler examines both sides of the debate. >> reporter: jessica teared up today over photos of her mom. >> it makes me want to fight harder, you know. >> reporter: michelle woo died from what a jury found to be medical dysfunction. >> i'm an only child. >> reporter: several attorneys denied to take her case because medical malpractice settlements are capped. upping that cap could cost billions. >> take it out of the health care system and put it into the pockets of the trial lawyers. this couldn't come at a worse possible time. >> reporter: advocates want lawyers to decide whether to overhaul the 38 year law. raise that cap on noneconomic damages such as pain and suffering from 200,000 to over $1 million. >> it's very important that the laws change. >> reporter: a jury said medical errors called robin franco's brain damage and she should get $1 million. >> she was only awarded $250,000 out of that 6 million. >> reporter: opponents include doctors, clinics, nurses, unions and local governments. >> a lo
editor john fowler and mental health service groups. one group bring change to mind worked with glenn close on anti- stigma public service announcements. >> her nephew who was diagnosed lost all of his friends after coming out of the hospital. through him telling his story it has been amazing to watch his life grow. >> to see more go to www.ktvu.com and click on hot tuppics -- topics. >>> new numbers on the housing market, the recovery being seen in one of the hardest hit. >> and a trip back in time in san francisco, the film festival that getting underway. >> trayvontrayvon martin's parents reaction and what they will do about the marches planned this weekend to call attention to the case. ♪ [ male announcer ] when the a.c. goes out in a heat wave, it's nuccio heating and air conditioning that comes to the rescue. at&t helped nuccio put a complete mobile solution to work. mobile routing to send the closest technician and mobile payments to invoice on the spot. where do you want to take your business? call us. we can show you how at&t solutions can help you do what you do... even be
to their group. they kept him quiet until paramedics got there. john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the placement board said the s.a.t. tests were thrown out because of seating irregularities. the school didn't apparently follow seating protocalls regulating the distance between desks and the directions students face. some students may have gained an unfair advantage but stopped short of saying that anyone cheated. >>> house republicans passed an education bill that rewrites former president george bush's signature law known as no child left behind. the bill passed in the house today. it shifts over sight from the federal government to the state. but faces significant opposition in the senate and the white house says president obama would veto the measure if it reaches his desk. >>> the u.s. postal service said today it is moving forward with plans to sell a historic postal office in downtown. it's been around for almost 100 years but the postal service is losing money and says it has to close postal facilities across the country. a group called citizens to save the berkeley po
to 5 years. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> now at 6, breaking news out of san francisco where two people are dead, a third wounded in critical condition. after a midday shooting inside the jewelrymart and gift center in san francisco. >> the search for a missing 1- year-old girl stretches into its second day. tonight only on 2, we talk with the little girl's sister about the questions now surrounding their father. >>> new developments in the crash of flight 214. the death toll has now gone up to 3 after a hospital announces a young girl has died from her injuries. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm frank somerville. >> and i'm julie haener. breaking news out of san francisco. two women are dead tonight and a suspect is now under arrest. this after a shooting at the jewelrymart and gift center. >> that jewelrymart is located at 888 brannan. not far from rei. it's just around the corner from police headquarters. the specific store inside where this happened is called vic toga. noelle walker joins us from outside that jewelrymart now with the latest on thi
chemotherapy. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler reported on this 7 years ago. he said patients felt less stress. use is not yet approved by the fda so doctors hope to demonstration in a study planned later this summer. >>> up next a few of earth you probably haven't seen before but he says he is not hero but not everyone agrees, a man rushed into a home and saved a man inside. >> back now to julie haener with more on what we are working on for 6:00 p.m. >> a burglar is arrested is that arrested -- arrested at the scene of a crime. >> a bus accident injures several tourists. what police say happened. >> these stories and more coming up in 10 minutes at 6:00 p.m. >>> people evacuated because of a wildfire are being back allowed home today. heavy rain helped yesterday. the fire burned 42 square miles and now 68% contained. 3500 firefighters were fighting the fire. 7 homes and 16 structures were destroyed. the evacuations orders effect 6,000 people. >>> a young man who raced into a burning home on saturday to save a man insists he is not a hero. others disagree. alex savage got his word
properly. reporting live, john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a south bay church leader is facing charges after they found more girls that were victimized at the child care center. more information on this ongoing criminal case. our robert handa is following the story. investigators say the number of girls involved here has now grown to four. >> reporter: that's right it was another emotionally wrenching day. a few days ago they found the list of charges is now longer and more will be added soon. former ymca child care worker leminey was escorted into court today. last week he was crying after he was being arrested. today he was calm after a third charge was added. this one police say involved a 5-year-old girl. >> he took sexually explicit photographs of her. detectives were able to corroborate those images by taking the unmistakable photographs from his cell phone. >> through good police work and good forensic police work we were able to recover images that are useful in the prosecution of this case. >> reporter: the ymca says it is assisting police and helping parents cope. >>
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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